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, it is inevitable. people say, the islamists have one, but mohammed morsi is this nonentity of a character. holding the reins of power is the army. defense trades atse strait the chiefs of power. you have to just love it. life gives a few gifts. on the 21st of november, you have this incredible story in the new york times about how barack obama has established this global confidence and trust, mohamed morsi has the mind of an engineer, of course the next day he assumes dictatorial powers by declaring that the timing was -- [laughter] this is the way that the muslim brotherhood operates. anyone who understands this could have seen this coming in long time ago. this is the essence of the problem. if you want to have a democratic process in the middle east, one that represents most of the people, you have to have islamist parties participate in that process. if you want to have a democratic outcome, do have to prevent the islamist parties from participating because the first thing they will do is destroy the democracy. the conclusion is we're not going to have a democratic future in the middle east an
professors and towns leaders and spreading it throughout. since mohammed can come to mohammed, the mountain goes to mohammed, right? and also the whole notion that in china and india where there's a tremendous amount of university research parks being bit and created, terry you talked about the labs that are built and ready to go. it's worse then that, isn't it? they're offering super star professors double the salary, everything they want plus if you're in the medical field any type of clinical testing want to do to make sure your elements get going because they have different laws then we do. my question is if there's a technology drain, it's also in terms of u.s. laws, we only prohibit certain type of technology drains. that has to do with national security and technology. but when you talk about in steve's case the talent of the innovative things that basically get sucked out along with that, that's something going sort of -- nobody talks about that. >> it's true. what you're saying is true. goes back to what you were saying before. other countries are stepping up efforts to be a magnet
for legislative business. that is live on c-span. we will look at egypt president mohamed morsi, and the referendum on a drafted convert -- constitution and the country. on c-span, a discussion on the impact of the government acts they passed a decade ago to improve services and productivity. >> this morning, jacqueline simon talks about how the fiscal cliff could impact federal workers. federal workers.
think it's worth noting that up until november 22, mohamed morsi was still consulting with the brotherhood and the brotherhood's leaders, but there was an effort to be somewhat independent and somewhat autonomous. there was a selfconscious effort to have some distance between the two. but that distance is closing because morsi needs the brotherhood now more than ever. and i think that's going to be one of the unfortunate byproducts. it might be fortunate in some ways in terms of being a little bit more effective on the economy, but in terms of societal consensus and reaching out, his close intertwining with the brotherhood may not be helpful. >> thank you. so there's an interesting possibility, in other words, that economic issues might force political compromise by the leadership in ways that political controversies are not, but you're saying that in practice what we're seeing is a besieged president reaching out to his own party to deliver people for him rather than reaching out to his opposition. khaled, anything you want to add to that? >> yeah. i mean, i agree wit
. protesters in egypt march on the palace as mohamed morsi flees. international and domestic news is all on the table for you this morning as we open up the phone lines. also, send us a tweet. or post your comment on facebook. or send us an e-mail. we will get back to that new york times story. first, some other headlines on the domestic front. here is the "washington times." also, sticking with the senate, the baltimore sun reporting this headline -- in politics, here is the denver post -- open phones before the first 30 minutes. we have a short show because the house is coming in at 9:00. steve in gaithersburg, maryland, a republican caller. caller: host: when did the republican party become the party that restricts poor? i understand the tax cut for the rich is important to some people, but i feel the good thing would be unlimited in of government at the federal level. that has nothing to do with this. that would be more on the spending cuts. host: what do you make of the back a plan being reported by the new york times saying if we cannot come to some sort of deal, we should just pas
on the charter. guest: this has been a controversy going back. on november 2nd, not egyptian president mohammed morsi issued decrees that insulated him in the constituent assembly writing the constitution from judicial review. there was concern that if the islamists dominated, they would be resolved by the courts which are, by and large, made up of judges appointed by hosni mubarak. this has thrown a dip into turmoil and produced protests. subsequently when the constituent assembly in an overnight session approved a constitution, it has now become a battle over the constitution. host: if you would like to talk about what is happening in egypt, here are the numbers. and if you are outside the u.s., -- just watching some footage from al-jazeera, why is this significant? guest: egypt is the most populous country in the arab world. have been a strategic ally of the united states. since the uprising that ousted house. mubarak, they have tried to maintain close ties with egypt. they are at peace with israel, but a country of that size in chaos, on the verge of economic collapse, it's not good for ame
president mohammed morsi's allegiances are as uncertain as his grip on power. under a foreign aid deal signed in 2010, when morsi's u.s. friendly predecessor hosni mubarak was in charge, the u.s. is giving the -- we're giving the plains to egypt -- the planes to egypt's air force. which already has more than 200 of the aircraft. the first four jets are to be delivered beginning january 22, a source at the naval air base in fort worth where the planes had been undergoing testing told foxnews.com. but the $213 million gift is raising questions on capitol hill. morsi is under fire for. the article gos on, buchanan, who recently called for ening foreign aid to egypt altogether said the muslim brother-backed morsi government has been sending increasingly troubled messages, or signals, to washington and giving it state of the art fighter jets is a dangerous idea. he's quoted as saying, american tax dollars must not be used to aid and abet any dictatorial regime that stands with terrorists. representative thornberry of texas, vice chairman of the armed services committee said eyipt is a wild
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7